Quechua SH100 X-Warm, Waterproof Mid Hiking Boots, Men's

Stay warm, dry, and enjoy our SnowContact grip technology
$59.99

Quechua SH100 X-Warm, Waterproof Mid Hiking Boots, Women's

Stay warm, dry, and enjoy our SnowContact grip technology
$59.99

Wedze Slash FR500, 100 Skis with Bindings

Freeskier Magazine Editors' Pick
$599.00

Wedze Slash FR500, 100 Skis with Bindings

Freeskier Magazine Editors' Pick
$599.00

Quechua SH100 X-Warm, Waterproof Mid Hiking Boots, Men's

Stay warm and cozy on your next hike!
$59.99

Quechua SH100 X-Warm, Waterproof Mid Hiking Boots, Men's

Stay warm and cozy on your next hike!
$59.99  

Wedze Slash FR500, 100 Skis with

Freeskier Magazine Editors' Pick
$599.00

Wedze Slash FR500, 100 Skis with

Freeskier Magazine Editors' Pick
$599.00
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Editors' Picks

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  • Editors' Picks
  • Compare All Skis

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Skis Comparator

Features Rookie FR100 Patrol FR500 Slash FR500 Pow Chaser FR900 Touring MT90 Boost 500 Cross 550+ Boost 580 Boost 900W

Use

Freeride

Freeride

Freeride

Freeride

Touring

Slopes

Slopes

Slopes

Slopes

Level

Beginner

Intermediate

Intermediate

Expert

Expert

Intermediate

Intermediate

Intermediate

Expert

Sizes

162 / 170 / 178

165 / 175 / 185

165 / 174 / 183

177 / 186

162 / 170 / 178

163 / 170

168 / 176 / 177

163 / 170 / 177

156 / 163 / 170 / 177

Sidecut, Radius, Fit

127/88/111

R = 17 M

136/96/118

R = 17.5 M

133/100/124

R = 15 M

139/115/134

R = 16 M

129/89/113

R = 18 M

126/74/111

R = 14 M

124/79/113

R = 16.8 M

124/79/113

R = 16.8 M

126/73/110

R = 14 M

Bindings

Tyrolia PR 11 GW

Tyrolia ATTA2 AT demo

Come FLAT and/or with bindings Look PX 12 Konect GW

Come FLAT and/or with bindings Look PX 12 Konect GW

Free Tour bindings compatible with pin inserts

Look Xpress XP 10 GW

Look Xpress XP 10 GW

Look Xpress XP 11 GW

Tyrolia PR 11 GW

Product page

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Designed & Tested in the Alps

Our mountain gear is designed and tested in the french Alps, at our Mountain HQ.

If you're not a bike expert, buying a road bike for the first time can be overwhelming. Read our advices in the 6 tabs below to know everything you should before buying a bike.

  • Budget
  • Geometry
  • Frame
  • Groupset
  • Wheelset
  • Size

Whatever your budget, Decathlon has a bike that will help you enjoy cycling to the fullest. How much to spend on your first road bike will obviously depend on how much you have to spend, but generally the more you spend on a bike, the better the bike you’ll get. Spending more should get you a higher quality, and usually lighter frame plus lighter wheels and components too. The gears, brakes, tires and wheels should offer a higher level of performance. Less weight means more speed and makes riding up hills easier, and all that shouldn’t come at the cost of durability. However, that doesn’t mean you have to spend big to get a good bike - far from it.

A new road bike can cost anything from $300 up to $10,000 - so when we say there is a bike for every budget, we really mean it. Better still, the technology and developments previously only seen on the most expensive bikes have now filtered down to pretty much every price point, so even the cheaper models offer a far greater level of performance than they would have even five years ago. That means you don’t need to spend the price of a small car on a bike to get into road cycling, and it can be very affordable activity once you’ve made the initial purchase of a bike and if you use your new road bike to commute on it’ll even save you money.

Our Van Rysel bikes have a size and fit that is designed primarily for racing, and puts you in crouched low position, with the handlebars lower than the saddle. It’s not a position that will suit everyone - especially when riding in the dropped part of the handlebars. The lower your position, the more aerodynamic you are and the faster you’ll be able to ride. As well as being fast road race bikes need to be agile with quick, sharp handling, but the stretched-out and low flat-back position won’t suit everyone, and if you’re new to cycling, can be a little intimidating. If you want to get into road racing, then choose a race bike, but if you don’t have any plans for racing, there may well be better choices.

Our Triban bikes take everything that is good about a road race bike - in terms of speed and handling, but offer a more relaxed position that is less extreme than a full on race bike, so they’re a lot more comfortable over long distances. No surprise then that sportive bikes are so popular with cyclists and are an ideal choice if you’re buying your first road bike. There other great plus is that the slightly more upright riding position and greater levels of comfort make sportive bikes an ideal choice for so many different types of road cycling from tackling a sportive, to riding to work or weekend blasts in the countryside.

It’s not just the shape of the frame that distinguishes a race bike from its sportive cousin, there is also the matter of gearing.

Race bikes are designed for speed and so the gearing is higher both for the front chainrings and the rear sprockets. Traditionally the front chainrings on a race bike would have 53 and 39 teeth respectively. These day though many race bikes have what is called a compact chainset at the front with a pairing of 50 and 34 tooth chainrings for easier climbing.

Nowadays the big difference in gearing between race and sportive road bikes usually comes at the back. Race bikes have more high gears and less low gears. While more gear teeth on the front cogs equals a higher gear it’s the reverse at the back where the smaller the cog the bigger the gear. So an 11-tooth sprocket is the highest gear, and on a race bike a 23 or 25 tooth cog will be the lowest gear.

Sportive bikes are designed for hilly riding and people who don’t not have the fitness of a bike racer - that’s most of us - so the gearing is typically lower with a bottom gear of 28 or even 32 teeth at the back to get you up even the steepest hills without having to get off and walk. Sportive bikes also usually offer a wider spread of gears - so you won’t necessarily sacrifice that 11 tooth top gear.

M