Shopping Cart
Give Us Feedback Your Opinion Matters! Give Us Feedback

5 great books to improve your tennis game

5 great books to improve your tennis game

What’s the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of tennis? A good book? Yeah, I didn’t think so.


But there are many things you can learn about the game of tennis from an interesting read. With a busy work schedule, it can be difficult to make time to get to the courts.


Fortunately, there is another way to practice. This list contains a few books on topics ranging from stroke technique to strategy and inspiration. You can even read them on your work commute!


Winning Ugly, by Brad Gilbert and Steve Jamison

Because winning is winning, right? Every shot in a tennis match has a great level of thought put into it. Winning Ugly focuses on the smart-thinking strategies implemented by Olympic gold medalist Brad Gilbert and outlines a few ways you can out-think any opponent.


Technical Tennis, by Rod Cross and Crawford Lindsey

If you really want to get down to the technical details of tennis, try this book. Cross and Lindsey examine the physics of tennis to show you how to control the ball better. Their advice is useful, but remember that it’s still important to consult with a coach before making major changes to your game.


Open, by Andre Agassi

This book may not teach you how to hit that Andre Agassi forehand, but it does find a way to inspire. Even though Agassi admits he actually dislikes tennis, the brutal honesty poured into Open will give even the least avid fan a newfound respect for the game. It reveals just how far extremely hard work and dedication can take you.


The Inner Game of Tennis, by W. Timothy Gallwey

It comes as no surprise to any tennis player that a good amount of the game (many would argue the majority) takes place in your head. This age-old classic discusses mental techniques players can use to stay focused and level-headed during a match. Top players like Billie Jean King have called the book their tennis bible. Today, this book continues to help many athletes in a variety of sports.


String Theory, by David Foster Wallace

String Theory is a fascinatingly written series of non-fiction essays by a man who has both played competitively and critically observed the sport. Wallace’s clear love for tennis will shine through and grace you with a renewed love for tennis that’ll motivate you even when you lose.


What aspect of the game are you working on? Mental? Physical? Perhaps, you’re simply in need of some motivation. Whatever your desire, these books will surely capture your interest and help you improve. Who would have thought you could actually improve your game off the court?

Comments

Explore Our Playbook